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State Humane Association of California - Legislation

Legislation

Bills Introduced in 2015
        
Bills Signed into Law in 2014
        
Frequently Asked Questions

Let us know what animal welfare legislation you think should be enacted in California by filling out this form.

 

Key Animal-Related Bills Introduced during 2015

Bill No.

Name

Legislator

Summary Position Status

AB 96

Animal parts and products: importation or sale of ivory and rhinoceros horn.

Atkins

Existing law makes it a crime to import into the state for commercial purposes, to possess with intent to sell, or to sell within the state, the dead body, or any part or product thereof, of an elephant and exempts the possession with intent to sell or sale before June 1, 1977, or the possession with intent to sell or the sale on or after June 1, 1977, if the item was imported before January 1, 1977. This bill would delete this exemption.

Support

Passed Assembly; In Senate. To Committee on Rules for assignment.

AB 147

Postsecondary education: animal research.

Dababneh

This bill would require any public postsecondary educational institution that confines dogs or cats for science or research purposes and intends to destroy the dog or cat used for those purposes to first offer the dog or cat to an animal adoption organization or animal rescue organization. The bill would not apply to animals suffering from a serious illness or severe injury, or to newborn animals that need maternal care and have been impounded without their mothers.

Support

Amended, and re-referred to Committee on Education.

AB 192

License plates.

Allen, Travis

Existing law establishes a specialized license plate program and requires the Department of Motor Vehicles to issue specialized license plates to a sponsoring state agency that meets certain requirements. Existing law requires that the department charge specified additional fees for the issuance, renewal, or transfer of specialized license plates. This bill would make a technical, nonsubstantive change to this provision.  

Support

Passed Assembly; In Senate. To Committee on Rules for assignment.

AB 316

 

Veterinarians.

Maienschein

This bill would specifically exempt from state licensing requirements a regularly licensed veterinarian in good standing who is called from another state by a law enforcement agency, animal control department, or a humane officer to attend to cases that are part of an investigation of an alleged violation of federal or state animal fighting or animal cruelty laws within a single geographic location when the law enforcement agency, animal control department, or humane officer determines that it is necessary to call the veterinarian to conduct the investigation in a timely, efficient, and effective manner.

Oppose

Passed Assembly; In Senate. Referred to Committee on Business, Professions, & Consumer Protection.

AB 317

 

Veterinary medicine: temporary shelter facility.

Maienschein

Existing law requires the registration of all premises where veterinary medicine, veterinary dentistry, or veterinary surgery is being practiced. This bill would exempt from the premises registration requirements an organization that establishes a temporary shelter facility during a state of emergency to provide veterinary medical care by a veterinarian who is regularly licensed in another state or territory of the United States if the temporary shelter facility meets specified requirements.

Oppose

Passed Assembly; In Senate. Referred to Committee on Business, Professions, & Consumer Protection.

AB 485

Personal income taxes.

Williams

This bill establishes Animal Homelessness and Cruelty Fund to be funded by voluntary contributions on CA personal income tax return.  Funds would be used for grants to shelters for: (1) programs that eliminate dog and cat homelessness (2) research that explores novel approaches to eliminating dog/cat homelessness and (3) prevention, investigation, and prosecution of animal cruelty/neglect.

Support

Passed Assembly; In Senate. Referred to Com. on Governance and Finance.

AB 494

Restraining orders: protection of animals.

Maienschein

This bill would authorize the court to issue restraining orders or protective orders to enjoin a person to stay away from an animal or forbid a person from, among other things, threatening, harming, or otherwise disposing of an animal. The bill would authorize the court to issue an order granting a petitioner's request for the exclusive care, possession, or control of an animal held by the petitioner or respondent if residing in the same household, as specified.

Support

Passed Assembly; In Senate. Referred to Committee on Judiciary.

AB 794

Criminal acts against law enforcement animals.

Linder

Existing law makes it a crime to injure any horse being used by, or any dog under the supervision of, any peace officer on duty. Existing law also makes it a crime to interfere with or obstruct a horse or dog being used by any peace officer. This bill would additionally make those crimes applicable when those acts are carried out against a horse or dog being used by, or under the supervision of, a volunteer police observer. The bill would also require a defendant convicted of those acts to pay restitution for a horse or dog that is used by or under the supervision of a volunteer police observer.

Support

Passed Assembly; In Senate. Referred to Committee on Public Safety.

AB 976

Personal income tax: deductions: pet adoption costs: voluntary contributions.

Steinorth

This bill, for taxable years beginning on or after January 1, 2016, and before January 1, 2021, would allow a deduction, not to exceed $100, under that law for the qualified costs paid or incurred by a taxpayer for the adoption of a pet from a qualified animal rescue organization.

Support

Passed Assembly; In Senate. To Committee on Rules for assignment.

ACR 9

Pet Care Education Month.

McCarty

This measure would declare the month of January 2015 as Pet Care Education Month and would request Californians to observe the month by ensuring that their companion animals receive the proper preventative care by establishing a financial plan for pet health emergencies and by contributing to charitable organizations that provide low-cost spay and neutering services and vaccinations or funds to help low-income individuals pay for veterinary care.  

Support

Referred to Committee on Rules

ACR 56

Official State Pet.

Linder

This measure would declare a shelter pet as the official State Pet.

Sponsor

Referred to Committee on Governmental Organization

SB 237

Animal control officers.

Anderson

This bill would require every person appointed as an animal control officer prior to July 1, 2016, to complete a course in the powers of arrest and to serve warrants no later than July 1, 2017. This bill would require every animal control officer and every director, manager, or supervisor, or any person in direct control of an animal control agency, appointed on or after July 1, 2016, to complete a course in the powers of arrest and to serve warrants within one year of appointment. This bill would require every animal control officer, prior to the exercise of the powers of arrest and to serve warrants, to have completed the course of training. 

Support

Failed Deadline

SB 457

Bobcat Protection Act of 2013.

Nielsen

This bill would provide that features used to delineate the boundaries of an area in which bobcat trapping is prohibited also include, but are not limited to, landmarks, and would make other nonsubstantive changes to these provisions of the Bobcat Protection Act of 2013.  

Support

Failed Deadline

SB 716

    

Animal cruelty: elephants.

Lara

Current law makes it a misdemeanor for any owner or manager of an elephant to engage in abusive behavior toward the elephant. This bill would, beginning January 1, 2018, additionally provide that abusive behavior toward the elephant includes the use of a bullhook, ankus, baseball bat, axe handle, pitchfork, or similar device by any person who houses, possesses, or is in direct contact with an elephant.

Support

Passed Senate; In Assembly. Held at desk.

 

 

Key Animal-Related Bills Signed into Law during 2014

Bill No.

Name

Legislator

Summary

AB 1511

Criminal history information: animal control officers.

Gaines

Would authorize the DOJ and local criminal justice agencies to provide state and local summary criminal history information to an animal control officer employed by a city, county, or city and county for the purposes of performing his or her duties. The bill would permit a local agency to charge a reasonable fee sufficient to cover the costs of providing that information.

AB 1685

Structural pest control operators:  fees

Williams

Allows email delivery (first class mail, posting in a conspicuous place on the real property, or personal mail already allowed) of notices from registered structural pest control companies to owner and tenant of the premises where work is to be done.  Allows Structural Pest Control Board to charge up to $60 for administering examination required for license to be an applicator.

AB 1809

Dogs:  health certificates

Maienschein

Would require a person seeking to bring a dog into this state, or importing dogs into this state for the purpose of resale or change of ownership, to obtain a health certificate with respect to that dog that has been completed by a licensed veterinarian and is dated within 10 days prior to the date on which the dog is brought into the state.

AB 1810

Deposits for keeping: abandoned animals

Maienschein

Current law requires a veterinarian, dog kennel, cat kennel, pet-grooming parlor, animal hospital, or any other animal care facility, as provided, to humanely destroy an abandoned animal, if unable to place the animal with a new owner. This bill changes the “shall humanely destroy” to “may euthanize”.  It also allows the facility to turn over to a shelter or rescue group, provided the shelter has been contacted and has not refused.

AB 1965

Outdoor dining facilities: pet dogs

Yamada

Would authorize a food facility to allow a person to bring a pet dog in outdoor dining areas if specified conditions are satisfied. The bill would authorize a city, county, or city and county to prohibit that conduct by ordinance.

AB 2056

Insurance: pet insurance

Dababneh

Would add pet insurance as a type of miscellaneous insurance, define certain terms, and specify certain disclosures an insurer of pet insurance is required to make to consumers. This bill would require an insurer of pet insurance to disclose, among other things, whether the policy excludes coverage because of a preexisting condition, a hereditary disorder, a congenital anomaly or a chronic condition, and would require that pet insurance policies have a free look cancellation period of not less than 30 days, as provided.

AB 2071

Recycled water:  pasture animals

Levine

This bill would require the State Department of Public Health to determine if the use of disinfected tertiary treated recycled water for the purpose of providing water to pasture animals would be safe for public and animal health. Would authorize the department to approve the use of disinfected tertiary treated recycled water for this purpose if the department determines that its use would not harm public or animal health but would prohibit the use of disinfected tertiary treated recycled water in the water supply for dairy animals that are currently producing dairy products for human consumption.

AB 2075

Crimes:  importation or sale of endangered animals

Alejo

Current law makes it a misdemeanor, after January 1, 2015, to import into the state for commercial purposes, to possess with intent to sell, or to sell within the state, the dead body, or any part or product thereof, of an alligator or crocodilian species. This bill would delay the effective date of this provision until January 1, 2020.

AB 2264

Victim compensation: guide, signal, or service dogs

Levine

Would provide when a person permits another dog to kill or injure a guide, signal, or service dog or a person intentially causes injury or death to a service dog then the persons with a disability are eligible for compensation from the Restitution Fund if the defendant is unable to make restitution.

AB 2364 State amphibian: California red-legged frog Perez

This bill would establish the California red-legged frog as the official state amphibian.

AB 2657 Environmentally sensitive areas:  use of anticoagulants Bloom This bill would prohibit the use of any pesticide that contains one or more of specified anticoagulants, including brodifacoum and bromadiolone, in wildlife habitat areas, as defined.
SB 1167

Vector Control

Hueso

Current law authorizes the State Department of Public Health, a county board of supervisors, or a governing board of a city to take specified actions, including purchasing poison, traps, and other materials, for the purpose of exterminating and destroying rodents. This bill would additionally require that person to abate specified conditions that are causing the infestation. The bill would also authorize the department, the county board of supervisors, and the governing body of a city to abate specified conditions that are causing the infestation.

SB 1323 Specialized license plates: Pet Lover's License Plate Program Lieu Would require the DMV to deposit the additional fees under the Pet Lover's License Plate Program into the Pet Lover's Specialized License Plate Fund, which the bill would establish. Requires that these funds be continuously appropriated to the Veterinary Medical Board for the sole and exclusive purpose of funding grants to providers of no-cost or low-cost animal sterilization services.
SJR 22 Cruelty-free cosmetics Block This measure would urge the United States Congress to enact legislation that would establish reasonable deadlines for the prohibition of the testing and marketing of cosmetic products that have been tested on animals. The measure would also urge the federal government to mandate alternative methods to animal testing of cosmetic products and to prioritize the validation and acceptance of additional nonanimal tests.

 


California Legislature FAQ

1. How does a bill become law?

2.
Where can I get detailed information on a particular bill?

3.
I don't know who my senator and assembly member are. How can I find out?

4.
How many senators and assembly members are there in California?

5.
Why is my senate district different than my assembly district?

6.
How often are state legislators elected? Does California have terms limits?

 

1.  How does a bill become a law?
When one of our legislators -- senator or assembly member -- seeks to introduce a bill, that legislator works with the Office of Legislative Counsel to draft the bill.  If the author of the bill is a senator, the draft bill is introduced on the floor of the Senate; if the author of the bill is an assembly member, the bill is read or introduced in the Assembly.  Thereafter, the bill is sent to the Office of State Printing.

A minimum of 30 days from the date of introduction, the bill is sent to the Rules Committee of the house in which the bill was introduced for assignment to the appropriate policy committee(s) for hearing.  At the hearing, the author presents the bill and testimony is heard in support of and in opposition to the bill from members of the public.  The committee then votes on the bill, which yields one of three possible outcomes.  The bill is either 1) passed, 2) passed as amended by the committee, or 3) defeated.

If the bill is passed (either the original or as amended), it is read for a second time in the house in which the bill was introduced and then the bill is assigned for a third reading.  Prior to the third reading, an analysis of the bill is prepared.  During the third reading, the author explains the bill, members discuss the bill, and a vote is taken by roll call.  Bills that require appropriation or take effect immediately require 27 votes in the Senate (out of a possible total of 40 ) and 54 votes in the Assembly (out of a possible total of  80).  All other bills require 21 votes in the Senate and 41 votes in the Assembly.

If the bill is passed, it is then sent to the other house, where the above process is repeated.  If the bill is amended in the second house, it must be sent back to the original house for approval.  If the original house does not approve the bill, it is sent to a  two-house conference committee to negotiate a bill that is satisfactory to both houses.  If a comprise is reached, the bill is sent back to both houses for a vote.

If the bill is approved by both the Senate and the Assembly, it is sent to the Governor, who may take one of three actions.  The Governor may 1) sign the bill into law, 2) allow the bill to become law without signature, or 3) veto the bill.  If the Governor vetoes the bill, it can still be passed by a 2/3 vote in both the Senate and Assembly.  If the bill becomes law, it generally goes into effect on January 1 of the following year.

2.  Where can I get detailed information on a particular bill?
Go to the Office of Legislative Counsel's official California legislative information website at www.leginfo.ca.gov and click on the "Bill Information" tab.  You will see detailed information about a bill, including its author, amendments, history, status, and analyses.

3.  I don't know who my senator and assembly member are. How can I find out?
Go to the Office of Legislative Counsel's official California legislative information website at www.leginfo.ca.gov and click on the "Your Legislature" tab.  You will also find useful links to legislators' web pages, legislative committees, the legislative calendar, and other related topics.

4.  How many senators and assembly members are there in California?
There are 40 Senators and 80 Assembly persons.

5.  Why is my senate district different than my assembly district?
California is divided into 40 Senate districts.  Within each Senate district, there are two Assembly districts, for a total of 80 Assembly districts.  To view a map of the Senate districts, click here.  To view a map of the Assembly districts in PDF format, click here.

6.  How often are state legislators elected? Does California have terms limits?
One-half of the Senators are elected or re-elected every 2 years for four-year terms.  A Senator may serve a total of two 4-year terms.  All Assembly members are elected or re-elected every two years for 2-year terms.  An Assembly member may serve a total of three 2-year terms.

 

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