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State Humane Association of California - Legislation

Legislation

Bills Signed into Law in 2013
        
Bills Signed into Law in 2012
        
Frequently Asked Questions

Let us know what animal welfare legislation you think should be enacted in California by filling out this form.

 

Key Animal-Related Bills Signed into Law during 2013

Bill No.

Name

Legislator

Summary

AB 265

Local government liability: dog parks.

Gatto

Provides that dog park owned or operated by city or county is not liable for injury or death of person or pet resulting solely from actions of dog in dog park. Does not otherwise affect liability, including that for maintaining a dangerous condition of public property.

AB 272

Rabies: vaccinations.

Gomez

Requires dogs to be vaccinated against rabies at 3 months or 4 months of age.

AB 339

Sale of animals at swap meets.

Dickinson

Bans sale of animals at flea markets and swap meets, with certain exceptions.
Sponsored by SHAC and Born Free USA

AB 711

Hunting: nonlead ammunition.

Rendon

Would require the use of non-lead ammunition for hunting all wildlife with firearms.
 

AB 789

Trapping.

Williams

Prohibits intentional drowning, chest-crushing and injection with chemical solvents that are not intended for euthanizing animals. Reduces the allowable size of Conibear trap (also known as a kill trap) from 10 inches to 6 inches on land and requires the use of warning signs where these traps are used on lands open to the public for the protection of domestic dogs. 

AB 1213

Bobcat Protection Act of 2013.

Bloom

Prohibits trapping of bobcats in the area surrounding Joshua Tree National Park. Requires Fish and Game Commission to prohibit the trapping of bobcats adjacent to the boundaries of each national or state park or wildlife refuge in which bobcat trapping is prohibited.

SB 132

Mountain lions.

Hill

Provides that nonlethal procedures shall be used when removing or taking any mountain lion not perceived to be an imminent threat to public health or safety.

SCR 61

Shelter Pet Awareness Month.

Galgiani

This measure would declare October of each year as Shelter Pet Awareness Month.

 


Animal-Related Bills Signed into Law during 2012

 

Bill #

 

Name

 

Legislator

 

Summary

AB 610

Vehicles: specialized license plates: Veterinary Medical Board: pilot program. Solorio   Gives one additional year to sell 7,500 spay/neuter license plates (until June 2013).

AB 1839

Veterinary medicine: veterinary assistants.

Ma

(1) Changes the term “unregistered assistant” to “veterinary assistant.”  (2) Limits access to controlled substances by veterinary assistants to those who have undergone and state and federal fingerprinting background check and have not been convicted of any drug- or alcohol-related felonies.

AB 2194

Corporations for prevention of cruelty to animals: humane officers: criminal history.

 

Gaines

Grants the Department of Justice the statutory authority required to request and receive federal summary criminal history information from the Federal Bureau of Investigations as required by Corporations Code sections 14502 and Government Code section 1030.

AB 2343

Criminal history information.

Torres

Requires summary criminal history information to be provided to an individual if it results in an adverse employment, licensing, or certification decision. Expands the scope of subsequent summary criminal history information provided.

SB 1145

Animal fighting.

 

Emmerson

Increases fine for permitting the fighting of specified animals from $5,000 to $10,000; increases fine for spectators from $1,000 to $5,000. Increases fine for manufacturing/owning gaffs or slashers for gamecocks from $5,000 to $10,000. Increases fine for owning/training an animal for fighting from $5,000 to $10,000.
SB 1162 Animal control: tranquilizers Runner Enables animal control and humane officers to administer tranquilizers if they receive prescribed training and meet several other requirements.

SB 1221

Mammals: use of dogs to pursue bears and bobcats.

Lieu

Would prohibit a person from permitting a dog to pursue a bear or bobcat at any time. This bill would exempt from that prohibition the use of dogs by federal, state, or local law enforcement officers, or their agents or employees, when carrying out official duties as required by law.  

SB 1229

Real property: rentals: animals.

Pavley

Restricts the ability of a person or corporation to impose conditions on occupancy of property that are based on declawing or devocalizing an animal that is allowed on the premises.
SB 1500 Seized and abandoned animals: full costs: forfeiture. Lieu Establishes procedure that enables seizing agency in cruelty/neglect cases to keep dogs and cats upon the superior court finding that the defendant would not be legally permitted to retain the animal even if the defendant is aquitted of the charges.

 


California Legislature FAQ

1. How does a bill become law?

2.
Where can I get detailed information on a particular bill?

3.
I don't know who my senator and assembly member are. How can I find out?

4.
How many senators and assembly members are there in California?

5.
Why is my senate district different than my assembly district?

6.
How often are state legislators elected? Does California have terms limits?

 

1.  How does a bill become a law?
When one of our legislators -- senator or assembly member -- seeks to introduce a bill, that legislator works with the Office of Legislative Counsel to draft the bill.  If the author of the bill is a senator, the draft bill is introduced on the floor of the Senate; if the author of the bill is an assembly member, the bill is read or introduced in the Assembly.  Thereafter, the bill is sent to the Office of State Printing.

A minimum of 30 days from the date of introduction, the bill is sent to the Rules Committee of the house in which the bill was introduced for assignment to the appropriate policy committee(s) for hearing.  At the hearing, the author presents the bill and testimony is heard in support of and in opposition to the bill from members of the public.  The committee then votes on the bill, which yields one of three possible outcomes.  The bill is either 1) passed, 2) passed as amended by the committee, or 3) defeated.

If the bill is passed (either the original or as amended), it is read for a second time in the house in which the bill was introduced and then the bill is assigned for a third reading.  Prior to the third reading, an analysis of the bill is prepared.  During the third reading, the author explains the bill, members discuss the bill, and a vote is taken by roll call.  Bills that require appropriation or take effect immediately require 27 votes in the Senate (out of a possible total of 40 ) and 54 votes in the Assembly (out of a possible total of  80).  All other bills require 21 votes in the Senate and 41 votes in the Assembly.

If the bill is passed, it is then sent to the other house, where the above process is repeated.  If the bill is amended in the second house, it must be sent back to the original house for approval.  If the original house does not approve the bill, it is sent to a  two-house conference committee to negotiate a bill that is satisfactory to both houses.  If a comprise is reached, the bill is sent back to both houses for a vote.

If the bill is approved by both the Senate and the Assembly, it is sent to the Governor, who may take one of three actions.  The Governor may 1) sign the bill into law, 2) allow the bill to become law without signature, or 3) veto the bill.  If the Governor vetoes the bill, it can still be passed by a 2/3 vote in both the Senate and Assembly.  If the bill becomes law, it generally goes into effect on January 1 of the following year.

2.  Where can I get detailed information on a particular bill?
Go to the Office of Legislative Counsel's official California legislative information website at www.leginfo.ca.gov and click on the "Bill Information" tab.  You will see detailed information about a bill, including its author, amendments, history, status, and analyses.

3.  I don't know who my senator and assembly member are. How can I find out?
Go to the Office of Legislative Counsel's official California legislative information website at www.leginfo.ca.gov and click on the "Your Legislature" tab.  You will also find useful links to legislators' web pages, legislative committees, the legislative calendar, and other related topics.

4.  How many senators and assembly members are there in California?
There are 40 Senators and 80 Assembly persons.

5.  Why is my senate district different than my assembly district?
California is divided into 40 Senate districts.  Within each Senate district, there are two Assembly districts, for a total of 80 Assembly districts.  To view a map of the Senate districts, click here.  To view a map of the Assembly districts in PDF format, click here.

6.  How often are state legislators elected? Does California have terms limits?
One-half of the Senators are elected or re-elected every 2 years for four-year terms.  A Senator may serve a total of two 4-year terms.  All Assembly members are elected or re-elected every two years for 2-year terms.  An Assembly member may serve a total of three 2-year terms.

 

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Each of the SPCAs and humane societies in the United States is individually incorporated and operated. They are not directly affiliated with each other or with any national groups, such as the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA) and the Humane Society of the United States (HSUS).

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